Goodrich, Barnard

männlich 1767 - 1834  (66 Jahre)


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  • Name Goodrich, Barnard 
    Geboren 27 Feb 1767  Essex, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  [1
    Geschlecht männlich 
    Gestorben 23 Feb 1834  Nottingham, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  [1
    Begraben Tower Cemetery, Nottingham, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  [1
    Personen-Kennung I152830  Zimbelmann
    Zuletzt bearbeitet am 22 Mai 2016 

    Vater Goodrich, Barnard,   geb. 1746,   gest. 1769  (Alter 23 Jahre) 
    Mutter Carr, Sarah,   geb. geschätzt 1746,   gest. Datum unbekannt 
    Verheiratet geschätzt 1766 
    Familien-Kennung F50083  Familienblatt  |  Familientafel

    Familie Cheney, Eunice,   geb. 4 Mrz 1777, ,, New Hampshire, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort,   gest. 17 Feb 1807, Nottingham, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  (Alter 29 Jahre) 
    Verheiratet geschätzt 1792 
    Kinder 
    +1. Goodrich, Gilman,   geb. 4 Dez 1797, South Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort,   gest. 19 Okt 1874, Fulton, Rock County, Wisconsin, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  (Alter 76 Jahre)
    Zuletzt bearbeitet am 22 Mai 2016 
    Familien-Kennung F50082  Familienblatt  |  Familientafel

  • Ereignis-Karte
    Link zu Google MapsGeboren - 27 Feb 1767 - Essex, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA Link zu Google Earth
    Link zu Google MapsGestorben - 23 Feb 1834 - Nottingham, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA Link zu Google Earth
    Link zu Google MapsBegraben - - Tower Cemetery, Nottingham, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA Link zu Google Earth
     = Link zu Google Earth 
    Pin-Bedeutungen  : Adresse       : Ortsteil       : Ort       : Region       : (Bundes-)Staat/-Land       : Land       : Nicht festgelegt

  • Grabsteine
    Barnard Goodrich
    Barnard Goodrich
    Tower Cemetery, Nottingham, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA

  • Notizen 
    • www.findagrave.com:
      www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=52933091

      Division of Parks and Recreation, NH:
      www.nhstateparks.org
      Before Pawtuckaway’s woods belonged to the state park, the lands were privately owned by families who hoped to make a prosperous life. Living in the mountains is not an easy feat, and many of the families struggled immensely. The soil of New England is very rocky and acidic which is not ideal for growing crops. Farmers would joke darkly that their hard work brought a great “crop of rocks” to their land. Times were tough and many families started to abandon their homes in the late 1800s to pursue the promising lands of the west. This abandonment is evidenced by old cellars and graveyards tucked away throughout Pawtuckaway’s woods. If you know where to look, these old homesteads can be easily found along some of our hiking trails. One of the families, the Goodriches, stuck around longer than most and had a prominent role in the history of Pawtuckaway.
      Take a quick drive to the Tower Road parking area (near the outhouse) and you’ll find some fascinating evidence of this family’s home. Sally and her husband Barnard Goodrich moved to this area from Massachusetts with their seven children in 1790. Sadly, hard times fell upon the family and six out of seven of the children died young. In the year of 1834 Sally’s husband and two of her sons died. The one surviving son, Nathan, died in the same year as his 101 year-old mother. Most of the Goodrich family is buried in a graveyard directly behind the massive Black Walnut tree on Tower Road. While this seems like a sad end to a long struggle, all was not lost for the Goodrich family. Nathan’s surviving son, George Goodrich, became a wildly popular and influential person in the Pawtuckaway region.
      Known as “The Barefoot Farmer”, George Goodrich stayed on his grandmother’s land for years and continue to farm. He would go into the town of Raymond to sell goods from his farm. Many people were shocked or amused by his appearance; he only ever wore ragged clothing and never wore shoes. George was one of the wealthiest people in the Pawtuckaway region, but he never felt it necessary to dress up. George’s father left the farm to George in the hopes that it would eventually be taken over by the state, and his hopes were realized when George’s widow sold the land to the state in 1920s.
      Sometimes I like to visit the old Goodrich homestead and imagine what it must have been like during George’s time. You can check out remnants of the family’s house in the stone cellar. Hop in the cellar and walk around barefoot in memory of George, and imagine what this area looked like in the past

  • Quellen 
    1. [S170] Findagrave.com, Uwe Zimbelmann, (www.findagrave.com).