Klein, Teafil

Klein, Teafil

männlich 1912 - 1981  (69 Jahre)

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  • Name Klein, Teafil 
    Geboren 12 Jun 1912  , McLean County, North Dakota, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  [1
    Geschlecht männlich 
    Gestorben 27 Sep 1981  Bismarck, Burleigh County, North Dakota, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  [1
    Begraben Sunset Memorial Gardens, Bismarck, Burleigh County, North Dakota, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  [1
    Personen-Kennung I157113  Zimbelmann
    Zuletzt bearbeitet am 20 Aug 2016 

    Vater Klein, Friedrich,   geb. 13 Jun 1876, Berlin, Tiraspol,, Rußland Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort,   gest. 11 Jan 1950, , Burleigh County, North Dakota, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  (Alter 73 Jahre) 
    Mutter Stolz, Julianna,   geb. 14 Jun 1875,   gest. 15 Jun 1947, , Burleigh County, North Dakota, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  (Alter 72 Jahre) 
    Verheiratet 4 Dez 1907  Neu-Freudental, Gebiet Großliebental, Region Odessa, Rußland Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  [1
    Familien-Kennung F51655  Familienblatt  |  Familientafel

    Familie Gruenberg, Mary Jane Louise,   geb. 16 Dez 1926, Underwood, McLean County, North Dakota, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort,   gest. 20 Mai 2010, Bismarck, Burleigh County, North Dakota, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  (Alter 83 Jahre) 
    Verheiratet 9 Jan 1951  [1
    Kinder 
     1. Lebend
     2. Lebend
     3. Lebend
     4. Lebend
     5. Lebend
     6. Lebend
     7. Lebend
     8. Lebend
    Zuletzt bearbeitet am 20 Aug 2016 
    Familien-Kennung F51667  Familienblatt  |  Familientafel

  • Ereignis-Karte
    Link zu Google MapsGeboren - 12 Jun 1912 - , McLean County, North Dakota, USA Link zu Google Earth
    Link zu Google MapsGestorben - 27 Sep 1981 - Bismarck, Burleigh County, North Dakota, USA Link zu Google Earth
    Link zu Google MapsBegraben - - Sunset Memorial Gardens, Bismarck, Burleigh County, North Dakota, USA Link zu Google Earth
     = Link zu Google Earth 
    Pin-Bedeutungen  : Adresse       : Ortsteil       : Ort       : Region       : (Bundes-)Staat/-Land       : Land       : Nicht festgelegt

  • Fotos
    Teafil Klein - 1950
    Teafil Klein - 1950
    Teafil Klein - 1950

    Grabsteine
    Klein, Teafil
    Klein, Teafil
    Sunset Memorial Gardens, Bismarck, Burleigh County, North Dakota, USA

  • Notizen 
    • www.findagrave.com:
      www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=101907129
      OBITUARY
      Funeral services for Teafil "Ted" Klein, age 69, of Bismarck will be held Wednesday, September 20, 11:00 a.m. at First Lutheran Church in Bismarck with Rev. Mel Soderberg officiating. He died Wednesday, September 27, at St. Alexius Hospital in Bismarck. Interment will be in Sunset Memorial Gardens, Bismarck.
      He was born June 12, 1912 in McLean County to Frederick and Juliann A. Stolz Klein and attended school in the Mercer area. He worked on farms until entering the military service in 1941. Following discharge in 1945 he returned to Washburn and worked on construction. After marriage to Mary Gruenberg on January 9, 1951 in Bismarck they lived at Riverdale, moving to Bismarck in 1956 where he worked at Farm and City Grocery until his retirement in 1973.
      He is survived by his wife, Bismarck; seven daughters, Tammy Kay Klein, Mrs. Harry (Wanda) Wolbaum, Julia Ann Raffich, Mrs. Joe (Vicky) Mills, and Mrs. Faron (Bonnie) Kendall, all of Bismarck, Connie Jo Klein, and Mrs. Darcy (Patricia) Ritter, both of Mandan; one son, Raymond, of Bismarck; 13 grandchildren and three sisters, Mrs. Amelia Tulberg, Santa Paula, Calif., and Mrs. Jake Schacher, and Mrs. Ed Wagner, both of Washburn.
      ***********************************
      MEMORIES OF TED
      One of Ted's nieces recalls, "I remember my mom, Lydia, telling stories about how Uncle Ted would put lots of pepper on food he didn't like; then his excuse would be that there was too much pepper on it for him to eat it."
      One of Ted's nephews recalls:
      I have a few memories of Grandma and Grandpa Klein's farm and my summer visits.
      First you need to understand that they were 'Share Croppers', someone else owned the farm and they were allowed to farm it. The owner and the farmer shared the income at some agreed to split. I was 10 or 11 years old when we moved to California so my memories of the farm, Julia and Fred are very vague to say the least. I probably stayed with them during 2 or 3 summers. So a little boy's recollections of the Farm.
      I have no idea how many acres they had to till but it couldn't have been very large because there were only two people to do the work, Fred and Ted, except during harvest when relatives and neighbors helped. There was one very old tractor, some basic farm equipment, one horse, Jerry the dog, some pigs, 4 or 5 cows, lots of chickens. There was a typical farm windmill which pumped water from a well into a large wood uncovered tank. The large animals drank from the tank. I guess grandma filled small vessels for the small animals to drink from. BTW I forgot there were lots of cats in and around the barn to keep the varmint numbers low. Grandma did most of the milking and she carried water in pails from the windmill to the house. She could hit a cat's open mouth from say 10 feet from the cow. Oh yes there was a very necessary out house.
      Uncle Ted took me with him to cut and bind some wheat one day. He apparently didn't have anyone else to help him. The job was to pull a "binder" with the ancient tractor to make bundles of wheat tied with "binder twine". My job was to sit on the binder with Uncle Ted driving the tractor pulling the binder. I was supposed to hold a lever down with my foot while the binder cut and tied the "shocks" of wheat, dropped them on a device that my foot was holding until there were say 5 or 6 shocks and then raise my foot and drop them in a straight line across the field. Well I didn't weigh enough to hold the lever down long enough to drop the bundles in a straight line. Finally Ted looked back and saw the bundles all over the place and lost it. I heard phrases such as "Got en hemal" and others. Since there was no one else around he put me on the tractor and the fun began. First I didn't weigh enough to push the clutch in so he pushed it in, got us moving, and jumped off the tractor right in front of the left rear spiked wheel that was turning. He ran around the binder, right in front of the cutting bar, and jumped on. So down the row we went until we reached the end. Ted screamed "turn left" I couldn't move the steering wheel so we ran right thru the neighbors barbed wire fence. Needless to say he never asked me to help him again.
      I remember that I bugged Uncle Ted to let me ride the horse and he ignored me until one evening he said that I could use the horse to get the cows. They had no bridles, saddles etc. Horse had a rope around his neck. Ted lifted me onto the horse's back and away I went. Usually the dog, Jerry, was sent to get the cows. Anyway sometime after being out of sight of the house the horse stopped fast, I went over his head, he took off and stepped on my foot went a few yards and started to graze. I'm screaming my head off in pain but no one could hear me. After what seemed like hours Jerry came by and gave me a disdainful look. Shortly Jerry goes by the other way with another look and the cows. Finally Grandpa shows up in their old car to pick me up. I spent a couple of days in pain with never a word about seeing a doctor.
      Grandma usually had a 50 pound sack of sugar under their bed and in season and if they had the money a bag of apples. I really enjoyed sucking on a corner of the sugar sack and snitching an apple now and then. These were the only sweets.
      These people really worked long and hard. Grandpa and Uncle Ted outside on the farming or fixing equipment and/or buildings. Grandma, BTW if she weighed 80 pounds I would be surprised, was either cleaning, washing clothes by hand, sewing or cooking. She had a large black coal burning stove for cooking and baking. She baked the best bread I have ever tasted in that black monster. The stove was also the house heater during those freezing North Dakota winters. Additionally, she heated her iron on that stove. She was always working, feeding the small animals, carrying water, cooking etc. No Appliances. This was primitive existence 1940's. No running water, electricity, natural gas or inside toilets.
      ANOTHER OF TED'S NIECES RECALLS:
      Ted's wife Mary Jane was first married to Emil Lieb. Emil's mother had a boarding house near the bar by the barber shop. Uncle Ted [Klein, Mary Jane Louise Gruenberg's second husband] ate most of his evening meals at that cafe. He worked at the Garrison Dam Project and owned a house in Washburn. Then he and Mary moved to Pick City after they married.

  • Quellen 
    1. [S170] Findagrave.com, Uwe Zimbelmann, (www.findagrave.com).