Grosshans, Johann Friedrich

männlich 1819 - 1891  (71 Jahre)


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  • Name Grosshans, Johann Friedrich 
    Geboren 24 Mrz 1819  Kassel, Gebiet Glückstal, Region Odessa, Rußland Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  [1, 2, 3
    Geschlecht männlich 
    Alias-Name Johannes 
    Gestorben 13 Jan 1891  Sutton, Clay County, Nebraska, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  [3
    Begraben Emmanuel Reformed Cemetery, Sutton, Clay County, Nebraska, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  [3
    Personen-Kennung I4014  Zimbelmann
    Zuletzt bearbeitet am 4 Aug 2014 

    Familie Mehlhaf, Christina,   geb. 29 Mai 1821, Kassel, Gebiet Glückstal, Region Odessa, Rußland Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort,   gest. 13 Feb 1863, Worms, Gebiet Beresan, Region Odessa, Rußland Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  (Alter 41 Jahre) 
    Verheiratet 4 Okt 1838  Glückstal, Gebiet Glückstal, Region Odessa, Rußland Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  [3
    Kinder 
     1. Grosshans, Sophie,   geb. 11 Sep 1850, Worms, Gebiet Beresan, Region Odessa, Rußland Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort,   gest. DECEASED
     2. Grosshans, Wilhelm,   geb. Mai 1852, Worms, Gebiet Beresan, Region Odessa, Rußland Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort,   gest. DECEASED
     3. Grosshans, Julie,   geb. 26 Okt 1853, Worms, Gebiet Beresan, Region Odessa, Rußland Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort,   gest. DECEASED
     4. Grosshans, Wilhelm,   geb. 6 Jul 1855, Worms, Gebiet Beresan, Region Odessa, Rußland Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort,   gest. DECEASED
     5. Grosshans, Johann,   geb. 24 Mai 1857, Worms, Gebiet Beresan, Region Odessa, Rußland Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort,   gest. DECEASED
    +6. Grosshans, Heinrich B. Sr.,   geb. 13 Mrz 1859, Worms, Gebiet Beresan, Region Odessa, Rußland Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort,   gest. 30 Jul 1931, Grand Island, Hall County, Nebraska, USA Suche alle Personen mit Ereignissen an diesem Ort  (Alter 72 Jahre)
    Zuletzt bearbeitet am 4 Aug 2014 
    Familien-Kennung F1380  Familienblatt  |  Familientafel

  • Ereignis-Karte
    Link zu Google MapsGeboren - 24 Mrz 1819 - Kassel, Gebiet Glückstal, Region Odessa, Rußland Link zu Google Earth
    Link zu Google MapsVerheiratet - 4 Okt 1838 - Glückstal, Gebiet Glückstal, Region Odessa, Rußland Link zu Google Earth
    Link zu Google MapsGestorben - 13 Jan 1891 - Sutton, Clay County, Nebraska, USA Link zu Google Earth
    Link zu Google MapsBegraben - - Emmanuel Reformed Cemetery, Sutton, Clay County, Nebraska, USA Link zu Google Earth
     = Link zu Google Earth 
    Pin-Bedeutungen  : Adresse       : Ortsteil       : Ort       : Region       : (Bundes-)Staat/-Land       : Land       : Nicht festgelegt

  • Notizen 
    • Gerald Ott:
      AFTN:XTGN-T6
      Marriage(1) Gluecksthal. FHL mfilm #188----
      Grosshans: Joh. 54 & Christine Perlenfein Bonekemper 52, Wilhelm Grosshanns 18, Hein. Grosshanns 9, Johannes Bonekemper19, Christine Bonekemper 21. 5 47 MS "Thuringia" 1873 7 Worms. A schoolmaster in Russia.
      Johannes came to Sutton, NE in 1873.
      Death: Husband of Christine geb. Perlenfein.Sutton NE Emmanuel Church Records. NEHS mfilm#8503/1, p. 326.
      --------------------------
      HISTORY OF THE JOHANNES GROSSHANS' FAMILY
      By Andrew Grosshans at the first Annual Picnic in Sutton, Nebraska on June 21, 1936
      I have been asked by those who sponsored this gathering of the members, descendants and relatives of the Grosshans family to give a short history of the family. Aside from a few newspaper articles, there is practically nothing in writing which I have found which gives any definite information regarding the early member of the family. Accordingly, what I have to say is almost entirely gathered from my own memory of facts and events, and from the personal knowledge of other members of the family. Because of this, there cannot help but be some things mentioned about which I cannot be sure, and about which there may be some mistake. Learning of our family by word-of -mouth, mostly during our childhood and from our fathers and mothers, what I will say will probably contain many errors of fact. Many of you can probably correct me in some of my statements.
      The early members of the Grosshans family were always very closely united. Their family ties were strong and enduring. This is shown by the fact that all of the eight children of John, or Johannes, Grosshans, who was the head of the family when it first migrated to Nebraska in 1873, came with him and all settled in and about Sutton. Some of these children were fully grown and married before coming to America, and in families less firmly united might well have gone elsewhere or have stayed in the old country. It is partially because of a desire to keep the descendants of the original Grosshans, family united that this reunion was held. It was felt that, if the family is now too large to be expected to be in this part of Nebraska, it is not too large but that the members can at least know and be acquainted with each other. Making such a picnic as this an annual event could not but help make all of us better acquainted.
      The German people had first migrated from Germany to Russia at a time when Russia was open to Germans for homesteads. They had moved in order to avoid the compulsory military service required in the fatherland; and particularly to avoid giving every second son solely for the purpose of war. They found Russia to their liking; they were not bothered, for the former German Princess, Czarina Catherine the Third, was then ruler of the Russians; furthermore the soil was rich and productive, being the greatest wheat producing country in the world. Their home in Russia was in the southern part, only 70 miles from Odessa on the Black Sea.
      Here the Grosshans and the other German families which also went to Russia settled in the villages of Worms and Rorbach. They came as Germans and remained Germans having their own Villages, their own Churches and schools. Their own school-masters taught in German, and they had German Clergymen. There was no intermingling between the Germans and the Russians, so that the German stock remained pure.
      These German families, including the Grosshans family, did very well in southern Russia. Some of them acquired land and accumulated wealth. Those who went in for large estates whether owned or rented, made sizable fortunes because wheat was a sure crop and the larger the land farmed, the larger the income. The sheep industry was also very profitable, and in this the Grosshans' were heavily -interested. Johannes Grosshans, the head of the Grosshans clan when it came to America, was reputed to have come here with at least thirty or forty thousand dollars, which at that time was considered a sizable fortune.
      In 1864, however, the peace of these Germans in Russia was shattered by the passage of a law by Russia's new Czar, Alexander 11, ordered the same sort of military duty that had driven them from the fatherland. The law was to go into effect 10 years later. During this 10 years, the decision to come to America was reached. All of them sold their land and their property, converting everything into cash. They then gathered all of the families together and started their journey to America. From the village of Worms, the Grosshans family, with the Griesses and Hoffmanns and others, went by wagon route to Odessa. The next portion of their journey was the long overland train trip from Odessa to Hamburg, Germany. There they embarked for America.
      Arriving in America, all were admitted to the country through the port of New York City. From there, they took trains west. The first stop was at Burlington, Iowa where three weeks was spent in examining Iowa land. Being dissatisfied all moved on to Lincoln where all women and children were left. From there, the men went north, through parts of South Dakota. On their trip they found land which was desirable, but could locate no good water, a thing which the leaders of the immigrating party insisted upon. On their way back to Lincoln and their families, they went through Hastings. Arriving at what is now Sutton, they found both country and water to their liking and there ended their journey.
      It is recorded that the heads of the German families which came to this part of Nebraska--The Grosshans', the Griesses and Hoffmanns, and others-bought a total of 16,120 acres of land. The Griesses and Grosshans' taking title in the name of Griess-Grosshans and Company. This was later divided and title was taken in the name of the men actually buying the land. Just how much land was' originally owned by Johannes, Grosshans, and by his sons, would be a matter for speculation--but it would probably be a fairly close guess to place the number of acres between 3000 and 3500.
      Here, in and near Sutton, these Germans families started again to make their own homes just as they had done in Russia. They established German schools, and built a church to which they brought a young German Clergyman, who was the son of the minister of their Village in the fatherland. The Rev. Bonekemper, you older ones remember well as we all went to school under him, were confirmed by him into the church, was minister of this same church for some 30 years.
      We can hardly realize the problems which the early Grosshans family and others had to face. The country being new, there was no livestock and very little other personal property other than what they could make. A party of men from the Grosshans and Griess families soon went to Missouri where they bought several carloads of horses. Then later, or perhaps some of them went on from Missouri, they went to Texas for cattle. There they bought wild, longhorn Texas cattle. These they found to be practically ungovernable, and so wild that they were unable to keep them within the bounds offences.
      Upon a division being made in the land, the sons of Johannes Grosshans bought varying amounts of land, and moved their homes to this land. Some of them had already built houses prior to their moving, and it was necessary for them to move their houses also. Several of the Grosshans boys moved their houses by placing them on wagons, and pulling them with teams of horses to the new location.
      Just as these early farmers had no cattle to begin with, so also they had few pieces of farm implements. In handling small grain in the field, and implement called a "self rake" was first used. This was a sort of hand method of getting the grain in bundles. The machine would rake off a bundle of loose grain on the ground and men would follow on foot and bind it in bundles, which were later stacked and threshed. Then came the Marsh Harvester, a machine with a platform where two men stood, and as the grain was elevated to the platform, bound it in bundles. In later years, the next improvement in handling small grain in the field was the use of a header. The headed grain was placed first in "header boxes", and put in stacks as it was cut. Still later ' crude early binders, operating on the same principle as our modern binders, came into use.
      As I have said, the original head of the Grosshans family in America was Johannes Grosshans. His only living child, Julia Arnold, is here today. He was my grandfather, and grandfather to many of those of you who are older. To still more of you he was a Great-grandfather. To some of the younger children, he would be a great-great-grandfather ' He was large stocky man, powerfully built, with a broad, intelligent, German - looking face. In the Russian Village of Worms, he was the schoolmaster for a number of years. Later he moved out of the Village on some rented land. He was a poor man at that time, and it is told that he borrowed money to buy a few head of sheep. Later he accumulated thousands of them. By his first wife he had the eight children, all of whom with their families came to America with him. His first wife died in Russia; her maiden name was Christina Mehlhaf. He remarried before the time of their immigration to America. His second wife was a widow named Christina Bonekemper, who had three children by a former marriage. There were no children of the second marriage of my grandfather.
      Of the five sons of Grandfather Johannes Grosshans, all but Henry were farmers. Henry with his father conducted a grain Business in Sutton. Henry also conducted a farm implement Business for a number of years. The other four sons owned and farmed land varying in amounts from a quarter section to a full section. However, the four sons who turned to the soil were not farmers only. Fredrick, who could speak no English when he arrived in America as a grown man, learned the language and was one of the country's early county commissioners. August also later entered the grain and implement business. William, in addition to farming, traded and dealt in horses.
      At the time grandfather Grosshans and his son Henry bought grain, they did not have the modern grain elevators that we have now where the farmers drive on a dump, have the load automatically dumped in a pit, later have the grain elevated to bins above, and from there run into cars, with hardly any hand labor. When they bought grain, they had what were called "shovel houses ". The farmers had to shovel the grain into this building by hand: then it was run over fanning mills which were run by hand. Hand labor only was used also in putting the grain through these mills and later into the railroad cars. In the busy season, they had men working in shifts day and night cleaning and loading grain. They purchased grain at that time from a considerable distance; sometimes as far out as 20 or 25 miles. I can remember wagons standing for several blocks long waiting their turn to unload. After a few years, when Uncle August bought grain, he had a modern elevator similar to what we have now.
      Schools were soon established by these Germans when they arrived in this country. For many years, their children attended German schools part time and English schools part time. Later, of course, as the community became more English speaking, the need and influence of the German school became less pronounced.
      Much of the social life of the early Grosshans families centered around the Church. All were devout members of the First Reformed Church. The first building in which Church and Sunday School was held was a building that Uncle Fred had used for a barn. He later moved his house to another part of the section but left this barn and donated the use of it to the Church. This was an adobe building. In later years, this was replaced by a frame building which was wrecked about a year ago and the lumber sold. Uncle Fred donated the ground for the Church and Cemetery. This Church was located five miles north and one mile west of Sutton.
      Church was then a family matter, all members of the family attending. This also aided in the close contact which was maintained by the members of the Grosshans family in the first and second generations removed from Johannes Grosshans. Because of family ties and because of the proximity to each other, even cousins were close friends, and contacts between relatives were many and intimate. Going to school together, being confirmed into Church at the same time, were all matters which served to make the bonds between relatives more binding.
      Johannes Grosshans, my Grandfather, was the head of the Grosshans family as it came to America in 1873. He was the father or grandfather of all the others by that name who came to this country with him. He brought eight children to this country with him, thus giving us eight distinct branches of the family. Named in the order of their birth, the children were; Katherina, Frederick, Christian, August, Sophia, Julia, Wilhelm, and Heinrich (Henry).

  • Quellen 
    1. [S1] www.pixel.cs.vt.edu, Uwe Zimbelmann, (www.pixel.cs.vt.edu/library/odessa.html Saint Petersburg Records ).

    2. [S37] Mark Fred Ziemann, Uwe Zimbelmann, (www.wikitree.com/wiki/Ziemann-6).

    3. [S186] Gerald Ott, Uwe Zimbelmann, (www.blackseagr.org).