Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA



 


Notizen: Wikipedia 2016:
St. Louis is a city and port in the U.S. state of Missouri. The city developed along the western bank of the Mississippi River, which forms Missouri's border with Illinois. In 2010, St. Louis had a population of 319,294; a 2014 estimate put the population at 317,419, making it the 60th-most populous U.S. city and the second-largest city in the state in terms of city proper population. The St. Louis metropolitan area includes the city as well as nearby areas in Missouri and Illinois; with an estimated population of 2,905,893, it is the largest in Missouri and one of the largest in the United States. St. Louis was founded in 1764 by Pierre Laclède and Auguste Chouteau and named after Louis IX of France. Claimed first by the French, who settled mostly east of the Mississippi River, the region in which the city stands was ceded to Spain following France's defeat in the Seven Years' War. Its territory east of the Mississippi was ceded to the Kingdom of Great Britain, the victor. The area of present-day Missouri was part of Spanish Louisiana from 1762 until 1803.
After the United States acquired this territory in the Louisiana Purchase, St. Louis developed as a major port on the Mississippi River. In the late 19th century, St. Louis was ranked as the fourth-largest city in the United States. It separated from St. Louis County in 1877, becoming an independent city and limiting its political boundaries. In 1904, it hosted the Louisiana Purchase Exposition and the Summer Olympics. Immigration has increased, and the city is the center of the largest Bosnian population in the world outside their homeland.
The economy of St. Louis relies on service, manufacturing, trade, transportation of goods, and tourism. The city is home to several major corporations including Express Scripts, Peabody Energy, Ameren, Ralcorp, Monsanto and Sigma-Aldrich, as well as a large medical and research community. St. Louis has two professional sports teams: the St. Louis Cardinals of Major League Baseball, and the St. Louis Blues of the National Hockey League. The city is commonly identified with the 630-foot (192 m) tall Gateway Arch in Downtown St. Louis.
History:
The area that would become St. Louis was a center of the Native American Mississippian culture, which built numerous temple and residential earthwork mounds on both sides of the Mississippi River. Their major regional center was at Cahokia Mounds, active from 900 AD to 1500 AD. Due to numerous major earthworks within St. Louis boundaries, the city was nicknamed as the "Mound City." These mounds were mostly demolished during the city's development. Historic Native American tribes in the area included the Siouan-speaking Osage people, whose territory extended west, and the Illiniwek.
European exploration of the area was first recorded in 1673, when French explorers Louis Jolliet and Jacques Marquette traveled through the Mississippi River valley. Five years later, La Salle claimed the region for France as part of La Louisiane.
The earliest European settlements in the area were built in Illinois Country (also known as Upper Louisiana) on the east side of the Mississippi River during the 1690s and early 1700s at Cahokia, Kaskaskia, and Fort de Chartres. Migrants from the French villages on the opposite side of the Mississippi River (e.g. Kaskaskia) founded Ste. Genevieve in the 1730s.
In 1721 after leaving Quebec, French traveller Pierre François Xavier de Charlevoix reached the area, calling it "the finest confluence in the world".
In early 1764, after France lost the Seven Years' War, Pierre Laclède and his stepson Auguste Chouteau founded what was to become the city of St. Louis. (French lands east of the Mississippi had been ceded to Great Britain and the lands west of the Mississippi to Spain; France and Spain were 18th-century allies and both were Catholic nations.) The early French families built the city's economy on the fur trade with the Osage, as well as with more distant tribes along the Missouri River. The Chouteau brothers gained a monopoly from Spain on the fur trade with Santa Fe. French colonists used African slaves as domestic servants and workers in the city.
From 1762 to 1803 European control of the area west of the Mississippi to the northernmost part of the Missouri River basin, called Louisiana, was assumed by the Spanish as part of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. In 1780 during the American Revolutionary War, St. Louis was attacked by British forces, mostly Native American allies, in the Battle of St. Louis.
St. Louis was transferred to the French First Republic in 1800 (although all of the colonial lands continued to be administered by Spanish officials), then sold by the French to the U.S. in 1803 as part of the Louisiana Purchase. The town became the territorial capital and gateway to the western territory. Shortly after the official transfer of authority was made, the Lewis and Clark Expedition was commissioned by President Thomas Jefferson. The expedition departed from St. Louis in May 1804 along the Missouri River to explore the vast territory. There were hopes of finding a water route to the Pacific Ocean, but the party had to go overland in the Upper West. They reached the Pacific Ocean via the Columbia River in summer 1805. They returned, reaching St. Louis on September 23, 1806. Both Lewis and Clark lived in St. Louis after the expedition. Many other explorers, settlers, and trappers (such as Ashley's Hundred) would later take a similar route to the West.
The city elected its first municipal legislators (called trustees) in 1808. Steamboats first arrived in St. Louis in 1818, improving connections with New Orleans and eastern markets. Missouri was admitted as a state in 1821, in which slavery was legal. As the state gained settlers, the first temporary of capital of the state of Missouri was St. Louis then the capitol of Missouri moved to St. Charles, MO then moved to the more central location of Jefferson City, MO in 1826. St. Louis was incorporated as a city in 1822, and continued to develop largely due to its busy port and trade connections. Slaves worked in many jobs on the waterfront as well as on the riverboats. Given the city's location close to the free state of Illinois and others, some slaves escaped to freedom. Others, especially women with children, sued in court in freedom suits, and several prominent local attorneys aided slaves in these suits. About half the slaves achieved freedom in hundreds of suits before the American Civil War.
Immigrants from Ireland and Germany arrived in St. Louis in significant numbers starting in the 1840s, and the population of St. Louis grew from less than 20,000 in 1840, to 77,860 in 1850, to more than 160,000 by 1860. By the mid-1800s, St. Louis had a greater population than New Orleans.
Settled by many Southerners in a slave state, the city was split in political sympathies and became polarized during the American Civil War. In 1861, 28 civilians were killed in a clash with Union troops. The war hurt St. Louis economically, due to the Union blockade of river traffic to the south on the Mississippi River. The St. Louis Arsenal constructed ironclads for the Union Navy.
After the war, St. Louis profited via trade with the West, aided by the 1874 completion of the Eads Bridge, named for its architect. Industrial developments on both banks of the river were linked by the bridge, the first in the mid-west over the Mississippi River. The bridge connects St. Louis, MO to East St. Louis, IL. The Eads Bridge became an iconic image of the city of St. Louis, from the time of its erection until 1965 when the Gateway Arch Bridge was constructed. The bridge crosses the St. Louis riverfront between Laclede's Landing, to the north, and the grounds of the Gateway Arch, to the south. Today the road deck has been restored, allowing vehicular and pedestrian traffic to cross the river. The St. Louis MetroLink light rail system has used the rail deck since 1993. An estimated 8,500 vehicles pass through it daily.
On August 22, 1876, the city of St. Louis voted to secede from St. Louis County and become an independent city. Industrial production continued to increase during the late 19th century. Major corporations such as the Anheuser-Busch brewery and Ralston-Purina company were established. St. Louis also was home to Desloge Consolidated Lead Company and several brass era automobile companies, including the Success Automobile Manufacturing Company; St. Louis is the site of the Wainwright Building, an early skyscraper built in 1892 by noted architect Louis Sullivan.
In 1904, the city hosted the 1904 World's Fair and the 1904 Summer Olympics, becoming the first non-European city to host the Olympics. Permanent facilities and structures remaining from the fair are Forest Park and associated structures within its boundaries: the St. Louis Art Museum, the St. Louis Zoo and the Missouri History Museum.
In the aftermath of emancipation of slaves following the Civil War, social and racial discrimination in housing and employment were common in St. Louis. Starting in the 1910s, many property deeds included racial or religious restrictive covenants against new immigrants and migrants. In the first half of the 20th century, St. Louis was a destination for many African Americans in the Great Migration from the rural South seeking better opportunities. During World War II, the NAACP campaigned to integrate war factories, and restrictive covenants were prohibited in 1948 by the Shelley v. Kraemer U.S. Supreme Court decision, which case originated as a lawsuit in St. Louis. In 1964 civil rights activists protested at the construction of the Gateway Arch to publicize their effort to gain entry for African Americans into the skilled trade unions, where they were underrepresented. The Department of Justice filed the first suit against the unions under the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
De jure educational segregation continued into the 1950s, and de facto segregation continued into the 1970s, leading to a court challenge and interdistrict desegregation agreement. Students have been bussed mostly from the city to county school districts to have opportunities for integrated classes, although the city has created magnet schools to attract students.
St. Louis, like many Midwestern cities, expanded in the early 20th century due to industrialization, which provided jobs to new generations of immigrants and migrants from the South. It reached its peak population of 856,796 at the 1950 census. Suburbanization from the 1950s through the 1990s dramatically reduced the city's population, as did restructuring of industry and loss of jobs. The effects of suburbanization were exacerbated by the relatively small geographical size of St. Louis due to its earlier decision to become an independent city, and it lost much of its tax base. During the 19th and 20th century, most major cities aggressively annexed surrounding areas as residential development occurred away from the central city; however, St. Louis was unable to do so.
In the 21st century, the city of St. Louis contains only 11% of its total metropolitan population, while among the top 20 metro areas in the United States, the central cities contain an average of 24% of total metropolitan area population. Although small increases in population have taken place in St. Louis during the early 2000s, overall the city lost population from 2000 to 2010. Immigration has continued, with the city attracting Vietnamese, Latinos from Mexico and Central America, and Bosnians, the latter forming the largest Bosnian community outside of Bosnia.
Several urban renewal projects were built in the 1950s, as the city worked to replace old and substandard housing. Some of these were poorly designed and resulted in problems, of which Pruitt-Igoe became a symbol of failure. It was torn down.
Since the 1980s, several revitalization efforts have focused on downtown St. Louis.
Urban revitalization continued in the new century. Gentrification has taken place in the Washington Avenue Historic District. In 2006, St. Louis received the World Leadership Award for urban renewal. In 2013 the US Census Bureau estimate that St. Louis had a population of 318,416.
In 2014, St. Louis celebrated its 250th birthday with events throughout the year. These were coordinated by the Missouri History Museum through its nonprofit entity, stl250, with help from the Saint Louis Ambassadors volunteer organization and its U.S. Small Business Institute. Commemorations of the Arch's 50th birthday are planned for 2015.
Wikipedia 2016:
St. Louis is a city and port in the U.S. state of Missouri. The city developed along the western bank of the Mississippi River, which forms Missouri's border with Illinois. In 2010, St. Louis had a population of 319,294; a 2014 estimate put the population at 317,419, making it the 60th-most populous U.S. city and the second-largest city in the state in terms of city proper population. The St. Louis metropolitan area includes the city as well as nearby areas in Missouri and Illinois; with an estimated population of 2,905,893, it is the largest in Missouri and one of the largest in the United States. St. Louis was founded in 1764 by Pierre Laclède and Auguste Chouteau and named after Louis IX of France. Claimed first by the French, who settled mostly east of the Mississippi River, the region in which the city stands was ceded to Spain following France's defeat in the Seven Years' War. Its territory east of the Mississippi was ceded to the Kingdom of Great Britain, the victor. The area of present-day Missouri was part of Spanish Louisiana from 1762 until 1803.
After the United States acquired this territory in the Louisiana Purchase, St. Louis developed as a major port on the Mississippi River. In the late 19th century, St. Louis was ranked as the fourth-largest city in the United States. It separated from St. Louis County in 1877, becoming an independent city and limiting its political boundaries. In 1904, it hosted the Louisiana Purchase Exposition and the Summer Olympics. Immigration has increased, and the city is the center of the largest Bosnian population in the world outside their homeland.
The economy of St. Louis relies on service, manufacturing, trade, transportation of goods, and tourism. The city is home to several major corporations including Express Scripts, Peabody Energy, Ameren, Ralcorp, Monsanto and Sigma-Aldrich, as well as a large medical and research community. St. Louis has two professional sports teams: the St. Louis Cardinals of Major League Baseball, and the St. Louis Blues of the National Hockey League. The city is commonly identified with the 630-foot (192 m) tall Gateway Arch in Downtown St. Louis.
History:
The area that would become St. Louis was a center of the Native American Mississippian culture, which built numerous temple and residential earthwork mounds on both sides of the Mississippi River. Their major regional center was at Cahokia Mounds, active from 900 AD to 1500 AD. Due to numerous major earthworks within St. Louis boundaries, the city was nicknamed as the "Mound City." These mounds were mostly demolished during the city's development. Historic Native American tribes in the area included the Siouan-speaking Osage people, whose territory extended west, and the Illiniwek.
European exploration of the area was first recorded in 1673, when French explorers Louis Jolliet and Jacques Marquette traveled through the Mississippi River valley. Five years later, La Salle claimed the region for France as part of La Louisiane.
The earliest European settlements in the area were built in Illinois Country (also known as Upper Louisiana) on the east side of the Mississippi River during the 1690s and early 1700s at Cahokia, Kaskaskia, and Fort de Chartres. Migrants from the French villages on the opposite side of the Mississippi River (e.g. Kaskaskia) founded Ste. Genevieve in the 1730s.
In 1721 after leaving Quebec, French traveller Pierre François Xavier de Charlevoix reached the area, calling it "the finest confluence in the world".
In early 1764, after France lost the Seven Years' War, Pierre Laclède and his stepson Auguste Chouteau founded what was to become the city of St. Louis. (French lands east of the Mississippi had been ceded to Great Britain and the lands west of the Mississippi to Spain; France and Spain were 18th-century allies and both were Catholic nations.) The early French families built the city's economy on the fur trade with the Osage, as well as with more distant tribes along the Missouri River. The Chouteau brothers gained a monopoly from Spain on the fur trade with Santa Fe. French colonists used African slaves as domestic servants and workers in the city.
From 1762 to 1803 European control of the area west of the Mississippi to the northernmost part of the Missouri River basin, called Louisiana, was assumed by the Spanish as part of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. In 1780 during the American Revolutionary War, St. Louis was attacked by British forces, mostly Native American allies, in the Battle of St. Louis.
St. Louis was transferred to the French First Republic in 1800 (although all of the colonial lands continued to be administered by Spanish officials), then sold by the French to the U.S. in 1803 as part of the Louisiana Purchase. The town became the territorial capital and gateway to the western territory. Shortly after the official transfer of authority was made, the Lewis and Clark Expedition was commissioned by President Thomas Jefferson. The expedition departed from St. Louis in May 1804 along the Missouri River to explore the vast territory. There were hopes of finding a water route to the Pacific Ocean, but the party had to go overland in the Upper West. They reached the Pacific Ocean via the Columbia River in summer 1805. They returned, reaching St. Louis on September 23, 1806. Both Lewis and Clark lived in St. Louis after the expedition. Many other explorers, settlers, and trappers (such as Ashley's Hundred) would later take a similar route to the West.
The city elected its first municipal legislators (called trustees) in 1808. Steamboats first arrived in St. Louis in 1818, improving connections with New Orleans and eastern markets. Missouri was admitted as a state in 1821, in which slavery was legal. As the state gained settlers, the first temporary of capital of the state of Missouri was St. Louis then the capitol of Missouri moved to St. Charles, MO then moved to the more central location of Jefferson City, MO in 1826. St. Louis was incorporated as a city in 1822, and continued to develop largely due to its busy port and trade connections. Slaves worked in many jobs on the waterfront as well as on the riverboats. Given the city's location close to the free state of Illinois and others, some slaves escaped to freedom. Others, especially women with children, sued in court in freedom suits, and several prominent local attorneys aided slaves in these suits. About half the slaves achieved freedom in hundreds of suits before the American Civil War.
Immigrants from Ireland and Germany arrived in St. Louis in significant numbers starting in the 1840s, and the population of St. Louis grew from less than 20,000 in 1840, to 77,860 in 1850, to more than 160,000 by 1860. By the mid-1800s, St. Louis had a greater population than New Orleans.
Settled by many Southerners in a slave state, the city was split in political sympathies and became polarized during the American Civil War. In 1861, 28 civilians were killed in a clash with Union troops. The war hurt St. Louis economically, due to the Union blockade of river traffic to the south on the Mississippi River. The St. Louis Arsenal constructed ironclads for the Union Navy.
After the war, St. Louis profited via trade with the West, aided by the 1874 completion of the Eads Bridge, named for its architect. Industrial developments on both banks of the river were linked by the bridge, the first in the mid-west over the Mississippi River. The bridge connects St. Louis, MO to East St. Louis, IL. The Eads Bridge became an iconic image of the city of St. Louis, from the time of its erection until 1965 when the Gateway Arch Bridge was constructed. The bridge crosses the St. Louis riverfront between Laclede's Landing, to the north, and the grounds of the Gateway Arch, to the south. Today the road deck has been restored, allowing vehicular and pedestrian traffic to cross the river. The St. Louis MetroLink light rail system has used the rail deck since 1993. An estimated 8,500 vehicles pass through it daily.
On August 22, 1876, the city of St. Louis voted to secede from St. Louis County and become an independent city. Industrial production continued to increase during the late 19th century. Major corporations such as the Anheuser-Busch brewery and Ralston-Purina company were established. St. Louis also was home to Desloge Consolidated Lead Company and several brass era automobile companies, including the Success Automobile Manufacturing Company; St. Louis is the site of the Wainwright Building, an early skyscraper built in 1892 by noted architect Louis Sullivan.
In 1904, the city hosted the 1904 World's Fair and the 1904 Summer Olympics, becoming the first non-European city to host the Olympics. Permanent facilities and structures remaining from the fair are Forest Park and associated structures within its boundaries: the St. Louis Art Museum, the St. Louis Zoo and the Missouri History Museum.
In the aftermath of emancipation of slaves following the Civil War, social and racial discrimination in housing and employment were common in St. Louis. Starting in the 1910s, many property deeds included racial or religious restrictive covenants against new immigrants and migrants. In the first half of the 20th century, St. Louis was a destination for many African Americans in the Great Migration from the rural South seeking better opportunities. During World War II, the NAACP campaigned to integrate war factories, and restrictive covenants were prohibited in 1948 by the Shelley v. Kraemer U.S. Supreme Court decision, which case originated as a lawsuit in St. Louis. In 1964 civil rights activists protested at the construction of the Gateway Arch to publicize their effort to gain entry for African Americans into the skilled trade unions, where they were underrepresented. The Department of Justice filed the first suit against the unions under the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
De jure educational segregation continued into the 1950s, and de facto segregation continued into the 1970s, leading to a court challenge and interdistrict desegregation agreement. Students have been bussed mostly from the city to county school districts to have opportunities for integrated classes, although the city has created magnet schools to attract students.
St. Louis, like many Midwestern cities, expanded in the early 20th century due to industrialization, which provided jobs to new generations of immigrants and migrants from the South. It reached its peak population of 856,796 at the 1950 census. Suburbanization from the 1950s through the 1990s dramatically reduced the city's population, as did restructuring of industry and loss of jobs. The effects of suburbanization were exacerbated by the relatively small geographical size of St. Louis due to its earlier decision to become an independent city, and it lost much of its tax base. During the 19th and 20th century, most major cities aggressively annexed surrounding areas as residential development occurred away from the central city; however, St. Louis was unable to do so.
In the 21st century, the city of St. Louis contains only 11% of its total metropolitan population, while among the top 20 metro areas in the United States, the central cities contain an average of 24% of total metropolitan area population. Although small increases in population have taken place in St. Louis during the early 2000s, overall the city lost population from 2000 to 2010. Immigration has continued, with the city attracting Vietnamese, Latinos from Mexico and Central America, and Bosnians, the latter forming the largest Bosnian community outside of Bosnia.
Several urban renewal projects were built in the 1950s, as the city worked to replace old and substandard housing. Some of these were poorly designed and resulted in problems, of which Pruitt-Igoe became a symbol of failure. It was torn down.
Since the 1980s, several revitalization efforts have focused on downtown St. Louis.
Urban revitalization continued in the new century. Gentrification has taken place in the Washington Avenue Historic District. In 2006, St. Louis received the World Leadership Award for urban renewal. In 2013 the US Census Bureau estimate that St. Louis had a population of 318,416.
In 2014, St. Louis celebrated its 250th birthday with events throughout the year. These were coordinated by the Missouri History Museum through its nonprofit entity, stl250, with help from the Saint Louis Ambassadors volunteer organization and its U.S. Small Business Institute. Commemorations of the Arch's 50th birthday are planned for 2015.

OpenStreetMap

Ort : Geographische Breite: 38.6270025, Geographische Länge: -90.1994042


Geburt

Treffer 1 bis 28 von 28

   Nachname, Taufnamen    Geburt    Personen-Kennung 
1 Bloechinger, Alvena Mary  6 Feb 1896Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I10562
2 Bochnicek, Frank William  23 Nov 1870Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I203963
3 Bochnicek, George  5 Aug 1904Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I203962
4 Durfee, Beulah Nondice  5 Mai 1930Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I110336
5 Ellington, Dorothy Maxine  22 Dez 1922Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I164232
6 Fiorito, Nicholas W.  8 Mrz 1909Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I210746
7 Grillet, Philip Jr.  29 Jan 1924Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I91307
8 Gutweiler, Anthony J.  18 Mrz 1904Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188697
9 Gutweiler, Elsie Louise  13 Okt 1897Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188701
10 Gutweiler, Lucille M.  20 Apr 1904Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188688
11 Gutweiler, Timothy David  25 Okt 1950Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188713
12 Gutweiler, William J.  7 Jan 1910Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188654
13 Gutweiler, William Jerome  6 Jan 1879Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188675
14 Lanzer, Lillie  13 Mai 1901Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I227043
15 Loker, Jerome Bonneparte  28 Aug 1889Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I205979
16 Mitchell, Emma Bernadette  1 Dez 1899Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I91304
17 Pille, Joseph H.  23 Dez 1893Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188707
18 Rule, Kenneth F.  18 Okt 1907Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I220434
19 Schimmelpfennig, Charles  Dez 1892Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188710
20 Schimmelpfennig, Genevieve  Jun 1895Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188711
21 Schimmelpfennig, Margaret  19 Sep 1890Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188706
22 Schultz, Jane Helen  9 Jun 1923Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188690
23 Schultz, William H.  17 Aug 1896Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188689
24 Stoughton, Earle  5 Mrz 1900Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I35393
25 Wharton, Shirley  5 Aug 1910Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I164163
26 Zimbelmann, Arthur Paul  20 Feb 1922Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I200904
27 Zimbelmann, Claude George Sr.  19 Jan 1928Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I71983
28 Zimpelmann, Nicholas Henry Jr.  7 Jan 1876Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I192832

Gestorben

Treffer 1 bis 50 von 51

1 2 Vorwärts»

   Nachname, Taufnamen    Gestorben    Personen-Kennung 
1 Bochnicek, Frank William  8 Apr 1910Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I203963
2 Bochnicek, George  12 Feb 1971Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I203962
3 Brogan, Howard Stuard Jr.  15 Feb 1992Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I103072
4 Deertz, Julius George  1918Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I13266
5 Dippel, Margaret  21 Sep 1910Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188680
6 Ellington, Dorothy Maxine  14 Dez 1932Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I164232
7 Ellington, Robert Relin  25 Mai 1977Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I164231
8 Fromme, Judith A.  16 Jun 2013Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I210740
9 Gutweiler, Anthony J.  Mrz 1983Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188697
10 Gutweiler, Anthony L.  16 Aug 1895Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188703
11 Gutweiler, Eddie  7 Jan 1888Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188693
12 Gutweiler, Frank A.  17 Okt 1904Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188692
13 Gutweiler, John E.  Mrz 1894Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188681
14 Gutweiler, John J.  7 Mai 1887Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188677
15 Gutweiler, Joseph  23 Apr 1896Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188679
16 Gutweiler, Joseph A.  Mat 1929Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188699
17 Gutweiler, Joseph L.  27 Sep 1954Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188684
18 Gutweiler, Lucille M.  5 Sep 1979Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188688
19 Gutweiler, Margaret  12 Dez 1919Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188704
20 Gutweiler, Timothy David  11 Feb 1983Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188713
21 Gutweiler, William J.  11 Nov 1979Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188654
22 Gutweiler, William Jerome  25 Mrz 1964Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188675
23 Hartnagel, Roland C.  8 Dez 1956Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188702
24 Hauswald, Salome  7 Mrz 1903Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188678
25 Heidemann, Louise  Dez 1912Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188700
26 Heinz, Klemens  Sep 1978Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I203403
27 Hummert, Fred W.  13 Feb 1923Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I204181
28 Knudson, Russell Hugo  Nov 1971Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I220413
29 Kouschuetzky, Katherine  13 Nov 2003Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I220412
30 Maxfield, George J.  16 Dez 1947Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I164229
31 Maxfield, Mary Ellen  15 Apr 1956Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I164230
32 Mitchell, Emma Bernadette  31 Jan 1994Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I91304
33 Petran, Katherine  21 Jan 1943Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I203964
34 Pille, Joseph H.  Apr 1972Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188707
35 Sauerbrunn, Johann Valentin  11 Sep 1902Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I219238
36 Schaetzel, Heinrich  12 Mai 1890Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I103962
37 Schimmelpfennig, Carl G.  2 Feb 1895Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188705
38 Schimmelpfennig, Charles  28 Mrz 1895Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188710
39 Schimmelpfennig, Genevieve  Jan 1990Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188711
40 Schimmelpfennig, Margaret  Okt 1972Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188706
41 Schmidt, Edward E.  1 Jun 2017Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I213294
42 Schnellbach, Cecillia  5 Mrz 1965Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I203404
43 Schultz, Jane Helen  5 Nov 1981Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188690
44 Senne, Solomon Sherman  26 Feb 1941Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188687
45 Wharton, Ida May  24 Mrz 1927Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I164228
46 Zimbelmann, Arthur Paul  5 Feb 1969Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I200904
47 Zimbelmann, Elsie M.  5 Aug 2017Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I188653
48 Zimpelmann, Amelia H.  6 Dez 1971Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I203961
49 Zimpelmann, Nicholas Henry Jr.  19 Mrz 1913Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I192832
50 Zimpleman, Bernadine  22 Nov 1962Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I204189

1 2 Vorwärts»



Begraben

Treffer 1 bis 3 von 3

   Nachname, Taufnamen    Begraben    Personen-Kennung 
1 Heinz, Klemens  Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I203403
2 Schaetzel, Heinrich  Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I103962
3 Schnellbach, Cecillia  Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA I203404

Verheiratet

Treffer 1 bis 6 von 6

   Familie    Verheiratet    Familien-Kennung 
1 Bothne / Boschee  1 Nov 1941Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA F37870
2 Feuchtenbeiner / Kindelberger  1860Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA F32565
3 Humbert / Nerget  17 Mrz 1866Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA F62621
4 Konzen / Conrad  22 Nov 1852Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA F48295
5 Lingelbach / Zimpelmann  24 Apr 1867Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA F77689
6 Schätzel / Kindelberger  1848Saint Louis City, Saint Louis County, Missouri, USA F32552