Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA



 


Notizen: Wikipedia 2016:
Iowa City is a city in Johnson County, Iowa, United States. It is the only City of Literature in North America, as awarded by UNESCO in 2008. As of the 2010 Census, the city had a total population of about 67,862. The Census Bureau estimated the 2014 population at 73,415, making it the fifth-largest city in the state. Iowa City is the county seat of Johnson County and home to the University of Iowa. Iowa City is adjacent to the town of Coralville and surrounds the town of University Heights, with which it forms a contiguous urban area. Iowa City is the principal city of the Iowa City Metropolitan Statistical Area, which encompasses Johnson County and Washington County and has a population of over 164,000.
Iowa City was the second capital of the Iowa Territory and the first capital city of the State of Iowa. The Old Capitol building is a National Historic Landmark in the center of the University of Iowa campus. The University of Iowa Art Museum and Plum Grove, the home of the first Governor of Iowa, are also tourist attractions. In 2008, Forbes magazine named Iowa City the second-best small metropolitan area for doing business in the United States.
History:
Iowa City was created by an act of Legislative Assembly of the Iowa Territory on January 21, 1839, fulfilling the desire of Governor Robert Lucas to move the capital out of Burlington and closer to the center of the territory. This act began:
"An Act to locate the Seat of Government of the Territory of Iowa...so soon as the place shall be selected, and the consent of the United States obtained, the commissioners shall proceed to lay out a town to be called "Iowa City".
Commissioners Chauncey Swan and John Ronalds met on May 1 in the small settlement of Napoleon, south of present-day Iowa City, to select a site for the new capital city. The following day the commissioners selected a site on bluffs above the Iowa River north of Napoleon, placed a stake in the center of the proposed site and began planning the new capital city. Commissioner Swan, in a report to the legislature in Burlington, described the site:
"Iowa City is located on a section of land laying in the form of an amphitheater. There is an eminence on the west near the river, running parallel with it."
By June of that year, the town had been platted and surveyed from Brown St. in the north to Burlington St. in the south, and from the Iowa River eastward to Governor St.
While Iowa City was selected as the territorial capital in 1839, it did not officially become the capital city until 1841; after construction on the capitol building had begun. The capitol building was completed in 1842, and the last four territorial legislatures and the first six Iowa General Assemblies met there until 1857, when the state capital was moved to Des Moines.
John F. Rague is credited with designing the Territorial Capitol Building. He had previously designed the 1837 capitol of Illinois and was supervising its construction when he got the commission to design the new Iowa capitol in 1839. He quit the Iowa project after five months, claiming his design was not followed, but the resemblance to the Illinois capitol suggests he strongly influenced the final Iowa design. One surviving 1839 sketch of the proposed capital shows a radically different layout, with two domes and a central tower. The cornerstone of the Old Capitol Building was laid in Iowa City on July 4, 1840. Iowa City served as the third and last territorial capital of Iowa, and the last four territorial legislatures met at the Old Capitol Building until December 28, 1846, when Iowa was admitted into the United States as the 29th state of the union. Iowa City was declared the state capital of Iowa, and the government convened in the Old Capitol Building.
Oakland Cemetery was deeded to "the people of Iowa City" by the Iowa territorial legislature on February 13, 1843. The original plot was one block square, with the southwest corner at Governor and Church. Over the years the cemetery has been expanded and now encompasses 40 acres. Oakland Cemetery is a non-perpetual care city cemetery. This cemetery is supported by city taxes. The staff is strongly committed to the maintenance and preservation of privately owned lots and accessories. Since its establishment, the cemetery has become the final resting place of many men and women important in the history of Iowa, of Iowa City and the University of Iowa. These include Robert E. Lucas, first governor of the territory (1838–41); Samuel J. Kirkwood, governor during the Civil War (1860–64), again in 1876, a U.S. senator in 1877, and subsequently secretary of the interior and U.S. minister to Spain; well-known presidents of the university, Walter A. Jessup (1915–33) and Virgil M. Hancher (1940–64); Cordelia Swan, daughter of one of the three commissioners who selected the site for Iowa City and the new territorial capitol; and Irving B. Weber (1900-1997), noted Iowa City historian. It is also home to the legendary monument called the "Black Angel", which is an 8.5 foot tall monument for the Feldevert family erected in 1912. The facts behind the Black Angel long ago gave way to myths, superstitions and legend surrounding its mysterious change in color from a golden bronze cast to an eerie black.
Founded in 1847, today's University of Iowa is recognized as one of the nation's top public universities, offering more than 100 areas of study for its 30,000 students. The institution's Writers' Workshop is internationally acclaimed, having fostered the creative talents of Wallace Stegner, Raymond Carver, Flannery O'Connor, T.C. Boyle, Rita Dove, John Casey, John Irving, Gail Godwin and Jane Smiley, and having as permanent or visiting faculty many prominent writers including its early director Paul Engle, Philip Roth, John Cheever, Nelson Algren, Frank Conroy, Marilynne Robinson and Kurt Vonnegut. The University also includes one of the leading medical schools and one of the largest university-owned teaching hospitals in the nation. Providing patient care within 16 medical specialties, the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics have been named one of "America's Best Hospitals" by U.S. News & World Report magazine. Iowa City is also home to Mercy Hospital, a pre-eminent provider of healthcare to the region.
Spring of 1970 was a tumultuous time on college campuses. On April 30, President Richard Nixon announced that U.S forces would invade Cambodia because of the recent communist coup. Students around the country protested this escalation of the Vietnam War. On May 4, the National Guard fired on students at Kent State University, killing 4 and wounding 9 people, which ignited protests all over the country.
Anti-war protests were not new to Iowa City or to elsewhere in Iowa; protests had been occurring throughout the 1960s. Spring of 1970 was different.
After the Kent State shootings, students marched on the National Guard Armory, broke windows there and also in some downtown businesses. The City Council gave the mayor curfew powers. On May 6 there was a student boycott of classes. That night about 400 people had a “sleep-in” in front of the Old Capitol. That night about 50 people broke into the Old Capitol and set off a smoke bomb. The protesters left voluntarily when asked to do so. Around 2 AM Friday morning President Boyd requested arrest of the students on the Pentacrest by highway patrolmen, but the next day he regretted the mass arrests and said he had received faulty information. On May 8, President Boyd cancelled the 89th annual Governor’s day ROTC observance for the following day. On Friday and Saturday a National Guard helicopter circled the Pentacrest.
In the early morning hours of Saturday, May 9, the Old Armory Temporary (O.A.T.), also known as “Big Pink”, which housed the writing lab, was burned down. This building was located next to the Old Armory, where the Adler Journalism and Mass Communications building currently is located. O.A.T was said to be at the top of a list of buildings for burning, probably due to its poor condition and was considered a firetrap.
The Iowa Alumni Review includes an article about the fire in which the author states: “Only the ends stayed upright. … On the south, Lou Kelly’s Writing lab bearing the sign ‘another mother for peace,’ escaped.” There was a second, smaller fire on Saturday evening in a restroom in the East Hall Annex.
By Sunday morning, President Boyd gave students the option to leave. Classes were not cancelled but students could leave and take the grade they currently had. An account of the May 1970 protests can be read in the June–July issue of the Iowa Alumni Review.
In his autobiography, My Iowa Journey: The Life Story of the University of Iowa’s First African American Professor, Philip Hubbard (University Vice-Provost in 1970) gives an administrator’s perspective of all the protests of the 1960s. He supported the students' right to protest and in 1966 stated: Students should not accept everything that is dished out to them. We don’t want to dictate what they should or should not do. However, student demonstrations should remain within the law and good taste without interfering with the university’s primary purpose of instructing students.
During this time there was also a strong ROTC presence on campus.
The 1970 yearbook includes many pictures of the men and women who chose to serve the country in this manner. Their presence on campus and the academic credit they received for their service was called into question by both students and faculty in the spring of 1970, but Boyd said he could not abolish ROTC. The Alumni Review had an article called “ROTC: Alive and well at Iowa” in the December 1969 issue which helps provide a more complete picture of this period in history.

OpenStreetMap

Ort : Geographische Breite: 41.6611277, Geographische Länge: -91.53016830000001


Geburt

Treffer 1 bis 3 von 3

   Nachname, Taufnamen    Geburt    Personen-Kennung 
1 Tolles, Elizabeth Ann  1862Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I203999
2 Zimbelman, George W.  1901Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I155999
3 Zimpleman, William C.  22 Sep 1893Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I192989

Gestorben

Treffer 1 bis 13 von 13

   Nachname, Taufnamen    Gestorben    Personen-Kennung 
1 Bruggemann, Hyacinth T.  15 Feb 1996Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I150154
2 Buchholz, Olga Maria  24 Feb 1977Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I147468
3 Cross, Catherine Norma  27 Jul 2003Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I147470
4 Cross, Otto Wilkons  3 Nov 1979Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I147469
5 Edwards, Merlyn Ray  7 Mai 1997Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I165468
6 German, Ivan Alan  24 Jan 1975Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I147824
7 Giunta, Benedetta M.  16 Aug 1999Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I148417
8 Klein, Alfred  27 Dez 1978Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I151180
9 Kruse, Mildred Marie  3 Mai 1965Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I150075
10 Lamphere, Austin Aron  20 Apr 1999Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I149982
11 Link, Cletus William  5 Aug 1954Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I151403
12 Miller, Clara Louise  21 Okt 1951Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I164162
13 Schaub, Johann Christoph  1869Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I198516

Begraben

Treffer 1 bis 10 von 10

   Nachname, Taufnamen    Begraben    Personen-Kennung 
1 Buchholz, Olga Maria  Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I147468
2 Cross, Catherine Norma  Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I147470
3 Cross, Otto Wilkons  Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I147469
4 Klein, Alfred  Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I151180
5 Klein, Joseph J.  Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I151182
6 Klein, Robert Charles  Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I151183
7 Lacina, Blanche Mary  2 Aug 2007Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I151181
8 Wharton, Carroll R.  Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I164167
9 Wharton, Eileen  Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I164164
10 Wharton, Shirley  Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA I164163

Verheiratet

Treffer 1 bis 1 von 1

   Familie    Verheiratet    Familien-Kennung 
1 Welle / Yessler  9 Sep 1944Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa, USA F54638